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. >> well-done. good job. >> coming up on c-span2, a look at egypt's parliamentary elections next month. that is followed by comcast ceo brian roberts on the future of cable and where technology is headed. then a look at the 10th anniversary of the iraq war with a discussion of how it has changed the middle east. and with congress on its spring recess this week we'll take the opportunity to show you booktv in prime time every week night. tonight, three books on u.s. innovation. it begins at 8:30 eastern. >> let's got straight to a personal topic. it has been, you've been on the commission since 2006. the chairman has been on i believe since 2009. his term is up. yours will be up next year. should we expect to see some turnover at the commission? >> you always expect to see turnover at the commission because we all have staggered terms. >> right. >> the past six years flown by very quickly and, we shall see. stay tuned. i get asked this question every couple of years. and when you've been there almost seven years you get asked at inflection points about this. i openly thinking about it b
university law society and the first female student to be elected and by this stage i was interested in social change. in ireland at that time time, there was a total equation of crime and i felt this was not allowing the private individual morality and also that there were non catholics and we should open up to minorities to respect to the viewpoint so in my inaugural address on law and morality i need some -- i made some recommendations we should legalize family planning and should not criminalize consenting behavior and we should not have suicide as a crime. i remember the speech caused in quite a fuss as it was new to the examination of the move to slightly larger audiences there was the moment of silence when i finished it i was worried they're less more than a decent applies but the thought was that is what students do maybe i have been more outspoken than others but then i was lucky to get fellowship to harvard university that was a wonderful year to be in harvard when i found they were questioning the immoral for of vietnam and escape -- is keeping the draft some of the civil
] it had gotten back down to its proper level, and all was well. you know, the election's over, and the president has been reelected, and the new congress has been sworn in, and we have basically what we had before other than the fact we spent $4 billion to have a president be reelected, the senate remain in one party's hand and the house remain in the republicans' hands. we have, we have effectively, we have gridlock. we have now, we have variations on these new terms like sequester, and so last week in washington they called the snow that never came the snowquester. we have things like the fiscal cliff that we would have thought you'd jump off of and die. so we're going from crisis to crisis, and nothing in the election really changed that. because our beloved nation is divided, the direction we should take is undecided as well. and meanwhile, the power of compounding is not our friend. our recovery is the weakest it's been in modern times. our entitlement programs, everybody recognizes, are unsustainable, literally unsustainable and grow in magnitude without change. our regu
elective accept of course for the relatives of those who died in beirut to it's hard to say how it will affect her legacy that it continues to be associated with her time in office. >> host: thank you for the book and for the interview. >> guest: thank you for having me. was a pleasure. >> got was "after words," booktv signature program which authors of the latest nonfiction books are interviewed by journalists, public policy makers, legislators and others familiar with the material. "after words" airs every weekend on booktv 10 p.m. on saturday, 12 and 9 p.m. on sunday and 12 a.m. on monday. you can also watch "after words" on line. good booktv.org and click on "after words" in the book tv series and topics list on the upper right side of the page. >>> jeffrey frank recounts the personal and working relationship between president dwight eisenhower and vice president richard nixon. mr. frank reports nixon constantly sought eisenhower's approval while eisenhower was unsure of mix and's ability to assume the presidency. it's about one hour and ten minutes. [applause] >> welcome to
was the gubernatorial election of 1902. he went down to the convention to support the progressive candidate at that time whose name was andrew jackson montague , and he was successful so that launched mackie's career. when he first got elected in 1903, he wanted to go out after the scandaling houses and the saloon and a sunday bars. he wanted to shut them down the the at lot of resistance from the small-town sheriff because he was aligned with the political machine. so he had to move together his own policy of supporters and conduct his own raids without much help from the sheriff. so he sent out letters to all of his political supporters saying what he was about to do is to the grade he was about to conduct and get people interested to find out if they wanted to be a part of the party. he got a good response and some of the elected prosecutor took this shotgun house his totem to all of these places. so the shotgun is interesting because some say that with mackie it's been passed down through various hands. the property of the arlington historical society. but then at some point it was displayed here in
my generation. from that decided to go make a film about the election in 2008 and went around the country interviewing members of congress about why they thought people weren't voting in trying to get them to vote and start an organization called generation 19 which took us around the country and registered new voters in 2000 then we did a similar film in 2012 as well is doing all that i went to in my youth where i graduated. >> host: we both were part of the same program then? >> guest: we both went there and it was a great program and a highly recommended. >> host: it allowed you to craft your own curriculum and you can cross-disciplines and that is the point. what did you do? >> guest: my concentration was the intersection of film technology -- technology with an emphasis on social change. >> host: your dedication page reads in part to my mother and father the greatest boomers i know. let's talk about that generation for a minute because they get some flack for some mistakes that they made and have made. >> guest: i think the boomer generation was an incredibly and is an in
direction the national democrats want to and winning elections with that approach. there is a lot to be learned both by the failure of the romney campaign in the senate races in the success of the republicans have had at the state level. >> host: we are taking your calls with grover norquist with americans for tax reform. our farmland or open democrats (202)585-3880 and republicans (202)585-3881. grover norquist known as an expert on some of these budget issues. you bring up the senate budget that we saw from budget chairwoman patty murray last week. talk about that and how you think it compares to paul ryan's budget? >> there are two major differences and they certainly going different directions. paul ryan's budget balances in 10 years and is not raise taxes and patty murray's budget never balances and raises taxes $1.5 trillion over the next decade. what the democrats and patty murray are saying in addition to the 600 million-dollar tax increase that obama won in january and they trillion dollars of obamacare tax increases that most americans are unaware of and they don't know
reagan's watch. that bombing isn't the first thing people associate with the name reagan. he was re-elected. except for the relatives of those who died in beirut. so it's hard to tell exactly how it will affect fully her legacy but definitely a moment that will continue by associated with her time in office. >> host: thank you so much for the book and the interview. >> guest: thank you for having me. it was pleasure. ... that the prosecution is from the most powerful branch in the judiciary? >> because prosecutors actually control the criminal justice system. they are the most powerful actors in the justice system because they make the charging and plea bargaining discussions in the criminal justice system and those decisions are the decisions that really drive the criminal-justice system. most people think about police officers being sort of the first people that, you know, are introducing the criminal-justice system and for the most part, that's true. police officers have a lot of discretion who they stop on the street and ultimately who they addressed. but the only bring individuals to t
the election. >> now, one of the things again, you this period, domestic turmoil and foreign turmoil, and it would be natural for a leader to feel beseiged, as you said. i'm wondering how much of that was brought with him? and at the knee back into to the story you lay out so beautifully. he doesn't seem to have a lot of friends. >> his friends work of his california friends, the drowns, and i think bob and carol finch were very good friends, even the finch was sort of pushed, when finch can to work with them he was sort of pushed out, but he, he was, he was sort of a famous lonely man in many ways. particularly as president but i think the key to them, the key to his failure as president, sort of accommodation having great power comes enormous by which he never had before, and you could see him beginning to exercise after he was elected. you would see these loony memos he would send out address to mrs. nixon from the president. >> loving. >> he suggested that -- the most maligned politician in american michigan or the great comeback. where is this coming from? and you could see this
buckley against the layout challenge to the federal election came a knock brought to the supreme court by senator james buckley with ralph winter, bob bork's friend from law school. the federal election campaign act set contribution and expenditure limits for federal offices and i'll submit the federal election commission independent of the president. according to the press to take politics out of politics but for possibly shift the balance of political control as congress in the coming end away from the president challenges. solicitor general bork some of his s.w.a.t team for cases. reran dolphin went to work on a brief in my stand is one of history's curiosities. the brief filed, and i quote, for the attorney general and the united state goes to great lengths to explain why speech and money are interchangeable come away surely would the first amendment is to set a limit on how much "the new york times" could charge him either further serious problems for the contribution and expenditure limit statute. next time somebody tells you a contribution or expenditure limit for an election is
a film about the election in 2008, and went around the country interviewing members of congress about why they thought more young people weren't voting, and trying to get my peers to vote, which led into starting an organization called generation 18, which registered 25,000 new voters in 2008, and then we did a similar film in 2012, and while doing all that i went to nyu, where i graduated. >> host: i understand we both were part of the same program there? >> guest: yes. we both went to gal latin. >> it allows you to craft your own discipline and you can cross-discipline. >> guest: my concentration was the intersection of film, technology and politics, with an emphasis on youth and social change. >> host: so your dedication page read in part, to my mother and father, the greatest boomers i know. let talk about their generation for a minute. the different mistakes they may have made. what's you're overall read on baby-boomers. >> guest: the boomer generation is an incredibly important generation in our nation's history. much of what is going on today in america would not have been possib
. from that they decided should go make a film about the election in 2008 and interviewing members of congress to get my peers to vote which led to starting an organization which took around the film registered voters in 2008 and a similar film and while doing all that i went to nyu where i graduated. >> i understand we were part of the same program. >> guest: yes i highly recommend it. >> host: it allows you to craft your own curriculum and you can cross disciplines. so what did you do? >> guest: my concentration with the intersection of film technology and politics was an emphasis on social change. >> host: so it sounds like your dedication page reads in part to my mother and father the greatest that i know. let's talk about the generation for a minute because they get some flax for mistakes they have made. what is your read on baby boomers. it is and was an incredibly generation in the history. much of what is going on today in america would not have been possible without them. the civil rights movement which they played a leading role in pushing it forward and ending the war in
has been working on a way to rally the faithful and plot a new strategy for the midterm election in 2014 and presidential contest in 2016. one of the silver linings which happened along the way is getting reelected as party chairman. to create a playbook for his silver lining, he also commissioned an inward look to see why the party failed to win and how to get a different result next time. so what did he come up with? he said yesterday on cps' "face the nation" that the rnc will spend $10 million on staff to communicate its principles across the u.s., shorten the time spent on election primaries, move up the convention date and limit the number of primary debates. findings on the so-called occupancy are what brings him here this morning. he's also celebrating his 42nd birthday here on our stage. >> 43. >> 41, i'm sorry. [laughter] young enough that it won't make a difference. to celebrate his 41st birthday, please help me give a warm welcome to republican national committee chairman reince priebus. [applause] >> all right, thank you. prison -- [applause] well, i appreciate that
anything, she wondered incredulously. he voted for lyndon johnson in the presidential election the first time so the whispers went that he ever cast such a mainstream coach for fear that a victory -- for the conservative republican barry goldwater would bring fascism to america. in eliot's opinion that was a bit overblown. increasingly appalled by the school's ideological slant, eliot began to vocalize his own political view to the he debated with his classmates in the basement cafeteria his chief opponent to the component was paul horowitz. his equal and intellectual in love of the good fight to the impromptu discussions often ended in shouting matches between the two. a hot topic in the lunchroom debate was cuba and the leader fidel castro who had come to power in 1959. most students saw castro as a romantic revolutionary bringing economic and social justice to his people. elite viewed him as another standard issue communist dictator. angela davis, mr. protagonist, was in the class of 1961. the class included robert deniro for a time. his parents were artists that lived in the village,
, and then i will stop on this, but they came, they had elections for an invisible government in 2005 again, as part of the 911 staying in the rest of the world. and women of course were not permitted to vote, but there was supposed to be another election in 2009, and they were told they might be able to. win 2019, there was no election for anybody. and then in 2011 came after the arab spring, suddenly there was an election. for men, not women. but there was a need to be seen to be giving something. so wedded been promised but not given was then given. so that's largely how things work. as saudi say, some of them say two steps forward, one step back. sounds -- some say two steps back in one step forward. but whatever do you take, it's a small margin for maneuver. yes, sir. >> thank you very much. i'm in communications. i had a chance to go to saudi once, and -- [inaudible]. they are talking about what you mentioned, they're talking about lots of, and it, like the people surround the kingdom. never talk about the king himself. >> it's always someone else's fault. >> in any kingdom or any kin
% but obama was elected and approval was 92% was that a population of haters? no. they to make discriminating judgments on the basis of how they assess the new leader of the same country so western europeans were unhappy with the leader they saw as an inarticulate proponent of unilateral action and who had a swagger in his step and not interested in their opinion and when the president left office in the new president seemed to be very good at articulating why it was in u.s. interest to be a multi a latterly, seek cooperation with other countries and embody a set of ideals about america as the united states is a land of opportunity all of a sudden it was very popular so there is not the deep and underlying consistent hatred of united states but it is rare. but foreigners can make distinguishing judgments of different aspects and behave accordingly. >>host: why should we care which germans think? when is the last time we were asked what we thought of angela merkle? >>guest: many in germany are interested in american opinion. this is true. >>host: but why? >>guest: because the united states has
and are not finding jobs and not moving ahead, that was missed during the election. there is no reason why we should have been the only ones just yet. >> this is the author of spin masters. thank you for joining us. >> thank you for having me. >> you're watching booktv on c-span2. here is our primetime lineup for tonight. up next, fiona deans hallora profiles thomas nast. the one associated with the donkey and elephant being associated with political parties. and john lewis and john carlos talk about their experiences during the civil rights movement. at 10:00 p.m. eastern, our weekly "after words" program. david bernstein sits down with a a special guest. he concludes nights programming at 11:00 p.m. eastern with sandra day o'connor in her book out of order. stories from the history of the supreme court. as a booktv.org for more information on this weekend television schedule. >> you are watching booktv on c-span2. coming up next, fiona deans hallora recounts the life of thomas nast. a regular contributor to harvard weekly, he made the donkey and the elephant the symbols of the the political parti
if the elected officials who rule the world. things could make a difference. it brings me to the proposal in which my argument issue. the proposal that in order give voice and a largeness of life and political act to what cities are already doing. what inner city organizations are doing. we need to convene something like a global assembly of city. a global parliament of payors. and in order to do that, are so you joining me, sir, or coming up to take those away? thank you. we need a global mayors pal -- parliament. not a top down executive telling cities what to do. but a representative organization that allows cities to consult, to opt in and out, and to do together what they are already doing informally. and let me just conclude by -- if you don't mind. i don't like to read. i'm going read the last few pages here of the chapter about global parliament. i want to be con skies and make clear what it's about. isn't that grandiose. isn't that kind of utopian. what i want to suggest is this when i propose a mayor's parliament, i'm not asking for a mandate for top down sovereignty by mega cit
elected as national congressman. you had very little access of black people to elite universities. you have almost exclusively a white felise department not only in the bay area but most cities in the country. and exclusions from the political apparatus and machines. so on a local level in this moment of civil rights the legality was that there was little institutional recourse. so people were asking, how do we deal with the civil rights movement? how do we stand up and make businesses and create a source of power? and bobby seale and huey p. newton figured out a way to do that by standing up to police brutality. initially those armed patrols were completely legal. they have studied the law and they knew what distance they needed to stand. when the guns could not be loaded in the cars and when a felon could not carry a handgun and all the very specific legislation around when and where it was legal and they emulated tactics done in l.a. and started to patrol the police and stand up. this is true of the local following. young adults who said that his power. that is standing up. we are g
that the american people went to the polls of in support of in the election just a few months ago. it takes the kind of truly balanced approach that families across our country strongly support, and i believe it is a strong and responsible vision for building a foundation for growth and restoring the promise of american opportunity. now, i spoke at length last night about our budget. it's built on three principles. number one, we have got to protect our fragile economic recovery, create jobs and invest in our long-term growth. this is something that every family in america is asking us to focus on. number two, we need to tackle our deficit and debt fairly and responsibly. as democrats, we understand that is a responsibility that we bear today and we do it in this budget. and number three, we need to keep the promises we made as a nation to our seniors and our families and our communities. many who have struggled so much over the last few years and are counting on us to be there for them again now. mr. president, we'll be hearing a lot more about all these principles today and we're going to discuss
different direction than the national democrats want to and winning elections with that approach. so there's a lot to be learned both by the failure of the romney campaign and the senate races and the successes the republicans have had at the state level. >> host: and we're taking your calls in this segment with grover norquist with americans for tax reform. the phone lines are open. democrats, 202-585-3880. republicans, 202-585-3881. independents, 202-585-3882. grover norquist known as an expert on some of these budget issues. you bring up the senate budget that we saw from budget chairwoman patty murray last week with. talk about that and how you think it compares to paul ryan's budget. >> guest: there are two major differences. they certainly go in different directions. the paul ryan budget balances in ten years and does not raise taxes. patty murray's budget never balances and raises taxes $1.5 trillion over the next decade. so what the democrats and patty murray are saying in addition to the $600 billion tax increase that obama won in january and the trillion dollars of obamacare tax
election of my life last fall. i had tracking cameras around me from st. patrick's day until november 6th, one to three cameras always focused on me trying to get a second or a minute that they could run against me in an ad. they didn't get a single second that they could run against me, not one second, by the way. [applause] but they're in the business of trying to undermine and weaken us, and i didn't back up on any principle. we debated the issue of life, and i said my opponent, my leftist opponent cannot answer two questions on life. is human life sacred in all of its forms? yes, it is. and at what moment does life begin? the instant of conception. and the people on the other side of this question dare not answer either one of those questions. they know they lose the debate. i stood on life, and i stood on marriage -- [applause] and the thing that a bunch of people that have been backing away from these challenges don't seem to realize that i'm still standing. [applause] now, why is that? i didn't run a campaign on jobs and the economy, jobbing and the economy, jobs and the economy an
grant starting when he was agenda and help to getting elected president twice. nast loved being close to the white house but he also had a true and tender affection for grant as a man, and they occasionally entertain one another. so president grant sometimes came to morristown but one example was after grant's world tour, when he ended his presidency, was not a great time in his life, he went on a world tour in a foreign was super excited. he gets home and comes to them in morristown and nast says, sal wants to know what he wants. and grant says, if he knew what they had served me all around the world, all i want is corn beef and cabbage. that's what the server to the president of the next eight. that's what he wanted. evidently he was very satisfied. so that's a lot of people that you didn't come to hear about, but so what. i would say that his wide circle of friends which this is a tiny sample helps to demonstrate the way that 19th century networks operated. humorous the writer to editor to politician activist to preacher. and on from there. the way in which nast stood at the center
election results and in the term was first us by and then hired him out right to manipulate public opinion in america. they also hired a playwright and entertainer because she traveled from country to country and met many heads of states and acted as a courier. one of the stars of gone with the wind worked for the irregulars and he was shot down by germans when he was carrying a document for the irregulars. the germans knew that he was a spy and they thought that his death would be bad for british morale. so the irregulars were a rather romantic plunge and the thought of themselves that way took their cover where they could find it. they had jobs in the embassy and the cover is that they were the air attache. she was supposed to be raising morale in america one of the jobs lost right propaganda which few people realize all of his early stories, there are stories of his escapades as a pilot there were street out front and the -- propaganda. they passed the british information services and were signed off by british officials and then send out to the saturday evening post, ladies home journa
. they will elect a new secretary general, but by rewriting the constitution, the countries that have been pushing for international regulation of the internet will be able to take all their ideas a step forward. they've been very patient and persistent over the years, and they will not quit until their goals are realized. it sounds like black helicopter conspiracy theory stuff but, unfortunately, it's not as was evidenced in dubai last december. so i'm not optimistic. i'm in touch with our state department and our department of commerce both of who have a role here, and the good news here in the u.s. is that we're all unified, congress seems to be unified. we had a rare moment last year when there were house and senate resolutions passed unanimously by both chambers, really underscoring our country's view of internet freedom. and why that view is important to the developing world, for the future of the developing world. and that's what's really the motor heartbreaking here. there are a lot of -- most heartbreak here. there are a lot of nations that are signing on to this tree that that will under
to elect a new secretary general. by rewriting the constitution, the countries that have been pushing for, literally international regulation of the internet, will be able to take all of their ideas a step further. they've been very patient incrementalists, very per sis tent over the years, and they will not quit until their goals are realized. it sounds like black helicopter conspiracy theory, but it's not as with evidence in dubai last december. i'm not optimistic. our state department and department of commerce do have a role here, and the good news here in the u.s. is that we're all unified. congress is unified, had a rare moment last year when there were house and senate resolutions that passed unanimously by both chambers. really, underscoring our country's view of internet freedom and why that's important for the future of the developing world, and that's what's heart breaking here. there's a lot of developing world nations that are signing on to this treaty that will actually undermind their economic future and political future, and it might be the regimes that are more author aut
for congress to wake up to our responsibility as elected officials and as stewards of this planet. the alarm has been sounded by the scientific community which overwhelmingly, overwhelmingly warns about the effects of our carbon dioxide emissions on our atmosphere and oceans. our defense and intelligence communities warn of the threats posed by climate change to national security and international stability. economists recognize the distortion of energy markets that overlook the true cost of carbon pollution, and government accountants now list climate change as a threat to our fiscal stability. now, today, as we enter the passover and easter season and as catholics the world over celebrate the selection of a new pope, we turn to voices of faith. they, too, call upon us. they call upon us to heed the moral imperatives of protecting creation and seeking justice for all people. they call upon us to reflect on our faith, on our relationship to our world and each other and on our responsibility to future generations. and they call upon us as president obama reminded us in his inaugural address t
of civil rights that you had only six congressmen, nationally who had been elected as national congressmen. you had very little access of black people to elite universities. you had almost exclusively white police departments not only in the bay area, but in most cities in the country. and fire departments. and exclusion from the political apparatus and machines, right? but on a local level, there was very little electoral representation. so in this moment the reality was that there was very little institutional recourse, right? and so people were asking how do we, how do we do what the civil rights movement did? how do we through standing up and making businesses possible, how to we do that? now, initially, those armed patrols were completely legal. they had studied the law, they knew at what distance they needed to stand, when the guns could not be loaded in the cars, that a felon could not carry a handgun. all the very specific legislation around when and where it was legal, and they emulated some tactics that were being done in l.a. and started to patrol the police and stand up. and in
to change is if we as citizens start to hold every elected officials accountable for the kind of laws that we put in place and we send a message to them that if you're going to vote with a nominal interest instead of the kids' interest we are not going to vote for you the next time around. [applause] that means we all have to figure out who are the school board members, state legislators and what steps they are taking on education reform. >> why do seem teachers receive the same rate every year? you touched upon it briefly earlier and is it the motivating for the excellent teachers come in and doesn't show poor performing teachers that they don't have to improve their own performance or regardless and it gets the same 2% raise every year regardless of what they do to the great future and the really hard work? >> again, you see why i was shocked when i was trying to make common sense changes and it got such pushback because you have some employees that are doing well and he should be little to compensate those employees even more. that depends on how the education system works. in educ
story that is completely missed during that election and there is no reason we should have been the only ones to see it. mike >> good afternoon. not so long ago i had a knee replacement which some of you will know something about that promised me that it would be a full recovery after a year. what better i don't have to wait two years. so, it is also likely to be out of the cold and the wind of new york city for a while. i woke up this morning feeling as if my knee was all better. it's the second time that i've spoken here and my wife and i spoke to get the last time because we had written a book together and this 1i wrote all by myself alone after two co-authored books was a new and novel experience. with that am i and -- in mind this morning we have asked which of the various ways, and i named them i should use to start to talk with one of the most telling a story ought. it for the richest american who's ever lived, his fortune in contemporary moderate dollars, a conservative estimate was $190 million. now this takes poor bill gates and warren buffett who have 30 or 40 or $50 million p
we are faced with on a day-to-day basis. on a national level we often hear our elected officials talk about creating jobs and building better schools and stronger communities. health is connected to every single one of those. on an individual level health is fundamental to opportunity. if you are -- if you're sick and you can't access the services you need your opportunity is less than disproportionate communities of color and lgbt communities are opportunities have been stifled because of the health disparities in our communities for generations. the affordable care act helps break that and really i think our view is the biggest piece of legislation our country has seen his incredibly exciting. when we talk about prevention this is a 2014 and beyond. it's right now. 71 million people with drive insurance today have access to preventive services without cause sharing requirements and that may not seem like a big deal to people but people with private insurance that 40-dollar co-pay or 20-dollar co-pay, that's $40 for gas or groceries. it's a big deal to me. i think i went to the gynec
or two after the election we start talking about the stimulus. it will be for one, maybe two years. we had a 21% increase during the first years of the obama administration over and above the solution. that dollar increase in spending adjusted for inflation is argentinian priest standing we had during world war ii, which is pretty phenomenal when you think about how much the country no place to go and fight world war ii there. this is larger for inflation. rather than the stimulus lasting for almost a couple years, not only can't we cut spending, but we can even slow the growth of spending or have a detrimental effect on the economy. obviously a shot newsome grassed a minute ago that indicated around economic growth is it going too well. the president often has made recommendations. so what i'm going to show you here is one of the graphs i have in the book. what you see here is the growth in government spending and employment if we slow the growth of government spending here. on one axis we have kind of the growth in government spending kind of one year earlier in the next year what ha
netanyahu has just been re-elected. so there were a series of miscalculations. but i think that what i would like to remind people of is that there is a tendency in the arab world, and possibly around the world to always say, america is just wrong it's america's fault. america didn't deliver. i think to some extent there is absolutely truth to that. but i think that it's also important for people in the region, for people like me, for people in the arab world, to come to grips with their own responsibility about what they can do. obviously it's very difficult for the palestinians to feel like they have the upper hand because they're certainly in a very difficult position, and they're not the strongest party at the negotiating tableful but it doesn't help the issues to just blame everything on the united states, and that is something that is ingrained a lot of people's thinking. >> host: what fascinated me, it's just a jumping off point, this private disagreement between the president and hillary clinton on how to approach the conflict. to ask you, were there lots of disagreements you could t
policy and an election in which voters spoke loudly and clearly, the american people want their elected representatives to stop arguing and reach some solutions. mr. president, i come to the floor today to discuss a budget plan that meets this challenge. the senate budget that passed through the budget committee last week with the strong support of all ten democrats and two independents. it is a responsible and balanced plan that puts the economy first and tackles our deficit and debt responsibly and credibly, and i am hopeful that after it passes the senate, the house of representatives stands ready to compromise as well and we can come together around a balanced and bipartisan deal that the american people expect and deserve. mr. president, the budget debate is too often discussed in terms of abstract numbers and political winners and losers, but the truth is that budgets are about far more than that. they are about our values and our priorities. they are about our visions for how government should be serving its citizens today and for generations to come. and most of all, they are ab
new york city. and then my daughter, we were watching the obama/hillary presidential election, and she was tiny, she was, like, 5. and she said, um, i said, you know, she was a big obama supporter, and i said, you know, wouldn't it be cool if there was a woman president? and she looked at me really disdainfully, and shelfs like, mom, of course there's been a woman president. >> that's awesome. >> it was within that short time we went from only ugly women become lawyers to of course there's been a woman president in a 5-year-old girl. so that said, it's very hard for those of us who grew up in the world in which our feminist class, books that are kind of causing people to talk today have names like the richer sex, or the end of men. more women than men get a college education, women are for the first time in the majority in the workplace, in managerial positions. so it's very hard for us to look back to that other time. and i was, you know, even though abstractly understand that things were different, we don't know, um, we we can't really see and feel it exactly. i interviewed janet mal
acquiring these books in such a short period of time? you weren't aware of who would inthe election. >> that's a terrific question. we struggled and talk abouted a lot in the second half of last year. it's something that all current events publishers have to deal with, but particularly for -- we focus on only conservative political books, that's our niche and we know every four years it's going an interesting challenge to try to publish in to the beginning of a new presidential term. especially when you don't know. you never do when it's going the incumbent or someone new. in cases it's going someone new no what matter what. we tried to sign up books that were very practical, and talking about what people needed to do to survive and thrive. kind of no matter who was in charge. then we knew that one the election was over, we would pivot one way or the other in the positioning of the book or the tightings of the book or the subtitling of the book. depending on who won. we would have had books that said we're in a mess, i have a chance of getting out. we have a lot of to work to do. here's what
that we're faced with on a day-to-day basis. on a national level we often here elected officials talk about creating jobs and building better schools and building stronger communities. health is connected to every single one of those goals. on an individual level, health, it's fundamental to opportunity. if you're not, if you're not -- if you're sick, if you can't access the services that you need, your opportunity is stifled. and disproportionately communities of color, lgbt communities, our opportunity has been stifled because of the health disparities that have been persistent in our communities for generations. the affordable care act helps break that and really, you could argue s the biggest piece of legislation our country has ever seen to target health disparities. it's incredibly exciting. when we're talking about prevention, this isn't in 2014 and beyond, it's right now. 71 million people with private insurance today have access to preventive services without cost-sharing requirements. and that might not seem like a big deal to people, but even people with private insurance,
they elect the county attorney. so he gave me an appointment he was very ninth set -- nice and agreeable and did say he had a woman on his staff and she did well and he would be happy to have another. i had a good resonate and i would be fine but he got his money from the county board of supervisors and only got so much money per year and he had spent his money and he had no more money for the year and could not hire anybody else. he was so sorry because he thought i could be but not without money. and he said i will show you around the office and he said you can see i don't have a vacant office. so i said i enter stand. i know you don't have any money right now but i will work for nothing until such time as a supervisor's give you more money. i will do that. that took his breath away then i said i net your secretary. she is very nice there is room in her office to put a second desk if she would not object and that was my first job. no pay and i put my desk with the secretary but i love my job. it was so interesting. everything and got to do was exciting so that is what i did. i don't re
. and this is when we had a much more successful election, the parliamentarian elections and so forth. there was an opportunity, i believe, at that stage to consolidate some gains and to move toward a sustainable political outcome. and we know that some of those efforts failed or weren't sufficient to consolidate those gains. and so the future of iraq is, obviously, very much in question beyond this point, but i think it's very important to understand that these conflicts evolve over time, and we're fighting enemies there who have a say in the future course of events, and we need to talk more about those enemies. what are they trying to achieve, what are their goals, what are their strategies? because then we could inform the public about what the stakes are. but instead we talk about only us, and we talk about only our number of troops and what we did and as if everything we did led to the outcome without any interaction with those against whom we're fighting. >> let's open the conversation now, and -- [laughter] i think what we'll do given the number of hands i see is we'll take two
and that the american end electorate and those in elected positions must build on the spirit that existed during the '60s that is way -- in the face of politics democrats and republicans moderates, liberals, progres sives, i'd go back to the historic site to learn, how to be more human. how to forgive for -- and how to move on. and that is what is needed today in american politics with the democratic process. i tell stories from time to time when i was a little boy was my responsibility to care for the chickens. i wanted to be a minister but from time to time with the help of my a brothers and sisters and cousins we would gather the chickens together and they would help to make up the congregation and i was the preacher and so much about their head and some would shake their head. [laughter] they never said amen. [laughter] i convinced they listened to me much better than my colleagues listen to me in congress. [laughter] [applause] and those chickens taught me patience, a discipline but also to never ever give up forgiving and. keep the faith. and that is what we must do today. >> never give up. [appla
president win the election in april. i think senator knows is, the economy, all of that is on the edge to either a pilot country. the vice president when he wins the election was likely to win is going to inherit all of the problems that already existed there and they're pretty critical. the one difference is he does not have the charisma that chavez had with 51% of the country. he's got his hands full, but we don't and dissipate and it's really a state department question. we don't anticipate any real change between our country and the venezuelan government at least in the short-term. >> admiral stavridis, i was not a proponent of the s.t.a.r.t. treaty, primarily because it did not address tactical nuclear weapons. the russians we now have continued to have not increased their arsenal, certainly modernized inventory of tactical weapons. what information can you give us relative to the continued reduction of nuclear weapons or the issue relative to technical versus strategic by the rush of this? >> stair, and classified level you are correct russians have basic ticket inventory of tact
as to how we're going to spend money and at least present to the american people who elected us to come here and represent them, at least tell them, give them the transparency of how we are spending their money. finally after 1,420 days, after four years we have a budget before us. and while i'm pleased we have a case and i'm pleased we're here debate debating it, it's disappointing when we learn what that budget offers. you would think after four years and the four years that we have been through and the 23 million people unemployed or underemployed and the rate of growth of this economy, half of what it normally is, you would think that that budget being presented to us here would take some steps toward addressing our spending issues and would not incorporate $1 trillion or more of increased taxes which will just simply go to more spending. how could we possibly support a budget with a $16.7 trillion debt that plunges us further into debt, with a staggering increase in debt, and also spending that doesn't reduce spending but simply reduces the rate of growth of spending, which is a step b
a democrat until he, um, worked for reagan's election. and then when he got into the administration and rose very quickly, then he became a republican. and in the administration he became embroiled in the iran contra scandal. angela attended brandeis, another east coast, mostly white school which didn't help her feelings of alienation, and she joined the communist party usa, and she first rose to national prominence when she went head to head with governor ronald reagan in california when the board of regents fired her from her first position as a professor for her membership in the communist party. she was then very soon after, actually, again the concentration of events in these people's lives in the '70s is remarkable. she was charged with murder and kidnapping and conspiracy in connection with an attempted jailbreak in the marin county courthouse in california. she went underground to evade capture, she was captured and spent 18 months in prison before her trial which was covered the world over. so i'll just read you one more piece from that. this is when she gets captured. reentering th
with that election weizmann you have never been that of the state not even more than 100 miles to come in contact with these people in different cultures and subcultures with the education, it helped to crystallize the concept of winter political change from the nationalists to international perspective for i saw the struggle at home. and rather vilifying white men began to criticize the space structure of rich white men. a change that proved invaluable and then as the war organizer later on. >> this is the big take away that the participants have. the opportunity to interact with folks that they did not have a chance to normally such as the appalachian whites they got them thinking and more sophisticated ways and a lot of people went to washington were relatively young teenagers and their 20s or 30s. there were older folks there but it was a majority of people who went to washington who stayed there for any period of time were younger. they had more time and did not have this kind of thinking form to through life yet the more important is the relationship between the chicano activists saying a g
, for example, we teach a newly elected members of congress program every two years. this year i taught, i think we had 56 newly elected members, and in addition to teaching them budgeting and event during the day, i mean, i had a whole group of them that met with him privately just to go through some of these issues. a lot of interest in reforming the veterans disability system. a lot of interest in what's going on in the tricare and pentagon health care system. a lot of interest in trying to get information. i have a lot of staffers on the hill who are contacting me and my students all the time trying to get information. i have not seen that translate into somebody who would fall on their sword, so speak, to try and lead a complete transformation in how we think about war costs, and you know i don't see anyone, unicode is sort of about to take that charge. i think a number of those who have looked at it carefully, for example, bob who was the head of the house veterans committee, who is very much embraced my reform ideas for the disability system. he left congress met andy is mayor of san dieg
on the global stage. president obama knew when he was elected that he wasn't going to be able to travel around the world and make america's case on a daily basis because he was going to be busy at home with the economy. so there was a very clear reason why he -- one of the many reasons why he chose her as secretary of state, because he knew she could do that for him on a daily basis in all around the world. and that's why i think that she would bring to him an accurate reading of where things stood, what she could deliver to him in terms of moving forward, in terms of agreement, in terms of where the players were when it comes to libya, for example. deliver to him, you know, what was needed for him to make the decision. she lost some battles, but she certainly influenced a lot of decisions. libya being one of them and asia, definitely. >> host: uh-huh, and we'll get to libya next, actually, i find that a -- it was a or very interesting scenario in what happened there. but just one last question on the israeli/palestinian conflict. i was covering aipac in 2010 when hillary clinton spoke at the
be a floor filled with senators debating the issues and voting on them. i think that's what we were elected to tkofplt -- do. and i think the people on c-span would like to see activity on the senate floor. madam president, i yield the floor and suggest the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: quorum call: aauto mr. coats: madam president? the presiding officer: the senator from indiana. mr. coats: madam president, i ask unanimous consent that the call of the quorum be vacated. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. coats: madam president, i was puzzled earlier today when the majority leader came to the floor to propose a unanimous consent request that we move forward with this continuing resolution. he's right, we should move forward with this. but i was puzzled by the fact that he said we've been standing around here now looking at each other and -- and we're not doing anything. well, we haven't done anything for the past 36 hours while we're trying to figure out who ought -- who has the right to offer an amendment and what -- wheth
in the midst of this fiscal crisis. we need to be different. we can't do it alone. we need the help of elected officials to give certain tea, flexibility and time to make change. if we can get the reforms to pay and compensation and if we get rid of weapons and infrastructure, we can begin to restore versatility of the joint force at an affordable and sustainable costs. as i stand here today, i don't yet know whether or if or how much her defense strategy will change, but i predict it will. we need to elected assumptions and adjusting nations to match abilities and that means doing less not less well. it also means wind and other instruments of power to help underwrite global security. of course he won't do this well if we don't that diplomacy and development with sufficient dollars. partners will have to work with us to collaborate with this on accepting greater share of the risk. some are more ready and willing to do that than others. i have to say the united arab emirates is their most credible and capable ally. our consistent first-line of defense has been and always will be our greatest s
. >> the next general election will be hillary and joe will be 70 years old. and what is coming. chris christie -- [inaudible] >> age and weight in one question. >> i don't think chris christie is too heavy. he said most popular republican governor in the country right now. several republicans and of course john kasich, the governor of pennsylvania. so in terms of 2016, this is the first open election on both sides and in 2008 i expect we'll have a lurch bill of candidate that she is going to be a very phenomenal candidate. there's a lot going where she beat jeb bush and marco rubio by double digits. she thought it would be a strong candidate. joe biden is strong candidate and we have an enormous number of good governors. martin of mali, governor cuomo of colorado. so i'm excited. >> are never going to complain. >> part of barack obama's appeal was young and vibrant. [inaudible] [laughter] >> in presidential politics -- as the country moves to a next generation of readership, they rarely if ever reach back and bring in an older generation. to a certain extent that was a factor for senator mccai
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